Since so many of you enjoyed the poems by Kipling we posted a short while ago here, we thought you might enjoy the following selection. The first one is, again very prescient. Kipling might have had our governments in mind who prefer paying Dane-Geld to applying the Law, never mind coming up with solutions. Let’s not forget that it is us, through our taxes, who are forced to pay Dane-Geld thanks to the supine and lazy attitude of this and past governments!


IT IS always a temptation to an armed and agile nation

To call upon a neighbour and to say: –

“We invaded you last night – we are quite prepared to fight,

Unless you pay us cash to go away.”

And that is called asking for Dane-geld,

And the people who ask it explain

That you’ve only to pay ’em the Dane-geld

And then you’ll get rid of the Dane!

It is always a temptation for a rich and lazy nation,

To puff and look important and to say: –

“Though we know we should defeat you,

we have not the time to meet you.

We will therefore pay you cash to go away.”

And that is called paying the Dane-geld;

But we’ve proved it again and again,

That if once you have paid him the Dane-geld

You never get rid of the Dane.

It is wrong to put temptation in the path of any nation,

For fear they should succumb and go astray;

So when you are requested to pay up or be molested,

You will find it better policy to say: —

“We never pay any-one Dane-geld,

No matter how trifling the cost;

For the end of that game is oppression and shame,

And the nation that plays it is lost!”

Just  so – and are there not now many voices who cry that our country is lost already?

The next poem is the prime example for how the ignorant, unthinking Left reads a title, thinks it’s gotta be racist, and condemns poem and poet forthwith, without any thought of what was actually said and meant. So without further ado, here’s your opportunity to make up your own minds on what this poem means:

The white man’s burden

TAKE up the White Man’s burden –

Send forth the best ye breed –

Go bind your sons to exile

To serve your captives’ need;

To wait in heavy harness

On fluttered folk and wild –

Your new-caught sullen peoples,

Half devil and half child.

Take up the White Man’s burden –

In patience to abide

To veil the threat of terror

And check the show of pride;

By open speech and simple,

An hundred times made plain,

To seek another’s profit,

And work another’s gain.

Take up the White Man’s burden –

The savage wars of peace –

Fill full the mouth of famine

And bid the sickness cease;

And when your goal is nearest

The end for others sought,

Watch Sloth and heathen Folly

Bring all your hopes to nought.

Take up the White Man’s burden –

No tawdry rule of kings,

But toil of serf and sweeper –

The tale of common things.

The ports ye shall not enter,

The roads ye shall not tread,

Go make them with your living,

And mark them with your dead !

Take up the White Man’s burden –

And reap his old reward,

The blame of those ye better,

The hate of those ye guard –

The cry of hosts ye humour

(Ah slowly !) towards the light:-

“Why brought ye us from bondage,

“Our loved Egyptian night ?”

Take up the White Man’s burden –

Ye dare not stoop to less –

Nor call too loud on Freedom

To cloak your weariness;

By all ye cry or whisper,

By all ye leave or do,

The silent sullen peoples

Shall weigh your Gods and you.

Take up the White Man’s burden –

Have done with childish days –

The lightly proffered laurel,

The easy, ungrudged praise.

Comes now, to search your manhood

Through all the thankless years,

Cold-edged with dear-bought wisdom,

The judgement of your peers.

Finally, to lighten the mood, a poem I particularly like because, what with immigration and invasion and all that occupying our minds, it shows that some invaders actually ‘got it’. Furthermore, it shows that, regardless of how powerful invaders are, the spirit of the Anglo-Saxons remains in our country’s DNA, forever:

The Norman and the Saxon

“My son,” said the Norman Baron, “I am dying, and you will be heir

To all the broad acres in England that William gave me for share

When he conquered the Saxon at Hastings, and a nice little handful it is.

But before you go over to rule it I want you to understand this:–

“The Saxon is not like us Normans. His manners are not so polite.

But he never means anything serious till he talks about justice and right.

When he stands like an ox in the furrow – with his sullen set eyes on your own,

And grumbles, ‘This isn’t fair dealing,’ my son, leave the Saxon alone.

“You can horsewhip your Gascony archers, or torture your Picardy spears;

But don’t try that game on the Saxon; you’ll have the whole brood round your ears.

From the richest old Thane in the county to the poorest chained serf in the field,

They’ll be at you and on you like hornets, and, if you are wise, you will yield.

“But first you must master their language, their dialect, proverbs and songs.

Don’t trust any clerk to interpret when they come with the tale of their wrongs.

Let them know that you know what they’re saying; let them feel that you know what to say.

Yes, even when you want to go hunting, hear ’em out if it takes you all day.

They’ll drink every hour of the daylight and poach every hour of the dark.

It’s the sport not the rabbits they’re after (we’ve plenty of game in the park).

Don’t hang them or cut off their fingers. That’s wasteful as well as unkind,

For a hard-bitten, South-country poacher makes the best man- at-arms you can find.

“Appear with your wife and the children at their weddings and funerals and feasts.  

Be polite but not friendly to Bishops; be good to all poor parish priests.

Say ‘we,’ ‘us’ and ‘ours’ when you’re talking, instead of ‘you fellows’ and ‘I.’

Don’t ride over seeds; keep your temper; and never you tell ’em a lie!”

Sometimes, it looks to me as if the Westminster establishment, MSM included, are behaving like certain Norman barons. They better heed the advice Kipling’s baron gives to his son …