Brexit

Express
DAVID Davis has turned up the heat on the European Union and warned them “the clock is ticking” on crucial Brexit trade talks. The Secretary of State for Exiting the EU insisted European negotiators were wrong to claim future trade relations could not be discussed until key aspects of Britain’s “divorce” were basically settled.  Mr Davis, who will next week hold his next round of monthly talks with EU Commission chief negotiator Mr Barnier, said: “With the clock ticking, it wouldn’t be in either of our interests to run aspects of the negotiations twice.” He added: “The early rounds of the negotiations have already demonstrated that many questions around our withdrawal are inextricably linked to our future relationship.”  Mr Davis said it was “simply not possible” to reach a near final agreement on future Irish-Northern Ireland border issues until discussions had begun about a new customs regime for trade. 

Mail
David Davis warned that ‘the clock is ticking’ yesterday as he told Brussels it will lose out if it delays Brexit talks. The Brexit Secretary urged the European Union to get on with negotiations on a future trade deal or risk weakening their economies by damaging the chances of a smooth transition. The warning came as it was revealed businesses have announced more than £50billion of investment in Britain since last year’s Brexit vote. Brussels has repeatedly said that talks on a trade deal will not begin until sufficient progress has been made on three topics – the so-called ‘divorce bill’, citizens’ rights and Northern Ireland.

Independent
Theresa May’s assertion that the UK can retain the benefits of the single market and customs union while breaking free of all European laws after Brexit has been mocked by the former chief of the Government’s legal services. It comes after the the Brexit department published a key position paper on the customs union last week, making clear that while the UK will leave the single market and customs union the Government will seek to remain closely linked to both. Ministers are expected to release a further paper this week on the the European Court of Justice (ECJ) – one of the Prime Minister’s “red lines” in the negotiations as she seeks to end the jurisdiction of the court in Britain.

Guardian
The British government’s hopes of opening discussions on a future trade relationship this autumn will definitely be dashed by the European Union due to the slow progress of Brexit negotiations, one of 27 prime ministers who will make the decision has said. Miro Cerar, the prime minister of Slovenia, revealed in an interview with the Guardian that it had proved too difficult to close the differences between the two sides in the opening rounds of talks, with the UK producing some unrealistic proposals. In October the European council, on which Cerar sits, will decide by unanimity whether sufficient progress has been made on the three key issues of citizens’ rights, the financial settlement and the Irish border, in order for talks to be widened to negotiations over future trade once the UK has left the bloc. Writing in the Sunday Times, the Brexit secretary, David Davis, reiterated his calls for such broader discussions to begin, insisting the issue of the Irish border is intrinsically linked to whatever future customs arrangement is struck with the EU. “

ECJ

Times
Britain could retain access to the single market without answering to the EU’s court under plans put forward by one of Europe’s leading judges. The compromise over one of the most intractable disputes of the Brexit process is being brokered by Carl Baudenbacher, president of the court of the European Free Trade Association. His proposals would allow Theresa May to retain her red line of withdrawing from the European Court of Justice (ECJ) while accepting European demands for independent judicial oversight of any future “deep and special partnership”. The UK would maintain close links to the EU’s programmes and markets.

Trade

Express
THERESA May’s plans for a hard Brexit could boost the UK economy by £135 billion a year, top economists have predicted. They believe the UK could reap trade gains worth £80bn annually by removing tariffs for both the European Union and the rest of the world. Deregulating the economy and other Brexit-related policies could provide a further £40bn a year boost, they added. The 16 pro-Brexit economists made the glowing assessment of the UK’s future outside the EU in a new 50-page report. Professor Patrick Minford, who helped draft the document, urged doom-mongering pro-EU figures to finally embrace Brexit.

Westmonster
Britain leaving the Customs Union and Single Market would boost the economy by £135bn, experts say. Removing trade tariffs and barriers could be a massive shot in the arm for  Britain’s finances and offer an extra £80bn-a-year, according to Professor Patrick Minford. Minford thinks there’ll be another £40bn increase simply by deregulating the economy. His report, ‘From Project Fear to Project Prosperity’, says UK businesses and consumers would benefit from lower priced imported goods and the effects of increased competition, which would force firms to raise their productivity. Minford said: “Project Fear failed yet many Remainers are trying to resurrect it. The government should embrace a clean, swift Brexit – avoid the uncertainty of a long, drawn out transition and embrace the opportunities of Brexit.”

BBC News
Removing all trade tariffs and barriers would help generate an annual £135bn uplift to the UK economy, according to a group of pro-Brexit economists. A “hard” Brexit is “economically much superior to soft” argues Prof Patrick Minford, lead author of a report from Economists for Free Trade. He says eliminating tariffs, either within free trade deals or unilaterally, would deliver huge gains. Other economists say cutting barriers sets off a “race to the bottom”. Economist Monique Ebell from the National Institute of Social and Economic Research (NIESR) says Prof Minford “ignores decades of evidence on how trade actually works”. Ms Ebell’s own research showed that if the UK left the single market but made unilateral trade deals with major developing economies and the Anglosphere, it would only claw back about one-third of the 20-30% reduction in lost total trade by leaving the EU.

Express
BRITAIN’S Brexit boom has seen £50billion invested in the UK and the promise of 44,000 new jobs. Analysis conducted by the Change Britain campaign group found firms from around the world were bringing their business to the UK. Leading economists have also predicted that a clean-break Brexit tied to a drive for global free trade could benefit Britain by as much as £135billion a year – the equivalent of £5,000 per family. Change Britain researchers looked at company statements and media reports, identifying announcements since last year’s referendum of planned investments worth more than £50billion. The true figures are likely to be even higher as some firms have made major announcements since the June 23, 2016 vote committing themselves to the UK but without giving figures for investment or jobs, said the group.

Telegraph
Britain’s post-Brexit trade deals will make the world a safer place by forging new alliances between the UK and other nations, the country’s new chief trade negotiator says today. Crawford Falconer warns of the “destructive political consequences of closed markets” as he calls on the G20 to break down trade barriers to boost global security. Writing in the The Telegraph he says the UK will lead efforts to avoid conflict by creating new trade allies around the world.  Mr Falconer will this week begin work alongside Liam Fox at the Department for International Trade and act as an ambassador for new deals. 

Sun
THE Government’s new chief trade negotiation adviser has said the trade deals Britain can strike after Brexit could help boost global security. Crawford Falconer tells The Telegraph that Britain will lead efforts to avoid conflict by creating new trade allies around the world. Last week, the Government conceded that the UK will not be able to implement any free trade agreements under a proposed customs transition deal which will expire around two years after Brexit in March 2019. But Mr Falconer, who will work alongside International Trade Secretary Liam Fox from this week, says that the UK can help promote stability by striking deals with nations that want to benefit from the country’s democratic reputation 
He said: “There is a powerful political and security element to getting this right.

Express
THE world will become a safer place once Britain secures trade deals outside the EU as it will help forge new alliances with the rest of the world, according the Britain’s new chief trade negotiator. Crawford Falconer acknowledged “destructive political consequences of closed markets” and hailed Britain’s role in helping to obliterate trade barriers towards the end of the 20th century. Mr Falconer claimed Britain has an opportunity to make a “real difference” in helping to promote global trade because of Brexit and hinted that the UK can deploy similar pro-trade tactics again to improve relations with foreign nations, which in turn would help to avoid conflict.

Fisheries

Sun
A FRESH Cabinet Brexit split has emerged after Michael Gove and Philip Hammond clashed over whether to use fishing rights as a negotiating pawn. The UK will take back full control over who can fish in thousands of miles of its territorial waters on our EU exit in March 2019. But a major division has opened up between the Chancellor and the new Environment Secretary over what to do with them, The Sun can reveal. The two Tory big beasts had an embarrassing clash over the issue during a recent Cabinet Brexit committee. During the confrontation, Mr Hammond said the government should pool the new power with the EU as a powerful card in exchange for big concessions on a trade deal with Brussels. But the government’s farming and fishing boss Mr Gove is adamant that Britain must retain full control of who get permits to fish in UK waters, as it was a totemic issue for Brexit voters in the referendum campaign last year.

Education

Mail
Teenagers scoring the top mark in the new GCSEs should not be given priority by universities because they are not necessarily the cleverest, a private schools leader has warned. Barnaby Lenon called on admissions tutors to ignore the new grade 9 for at least a year as only time will tell if it truly indicates greater intellectual ability. Instead, it could simply show that a candidate can write fast or is good at checking for silly errors, the chairman of the Independent Schools Council said. Pupils this year sat new, tougher GCSEs in maths, English literature and English language with more rigorous content and a new grading system. Replacing the A* to G scale is a numerical system, with 9 the top mark and 1 the lowest. 

Election

Independent
Voters switched party allegiances at unprecedented rates in the general election as they tried to game the failing electoral system, according to voting reform campaigners. Elections are now more like lottery than a real choice with 22 million votes cast in June having no impact on the result, the Electoral Reform Society (ERS) found. It branded the June vote the “hold your nose” election after an estimated 6.5 million people made tactical decisions and said the Conservatives could have won a majority if just 0.0016 per cent of voters had chosen differently. The first-past-the-post system is exaggerating divisions because of the huge discrepancy in the number of votes cast in an area for a party and the number of seats it wins and a new system must now be introduced, the ERS said. Labour won 29% of votes cast in the South East but got just 10% of seats, while Tories won 34% of the North East but returned just 9 per cent of seats, according to its research

Sun
BRITS are switching between political parties at “astonishing” levels as it emerges 6.5million voted tactically in June’s general election. The 2017 nationwide poll also saw the second highest movement of votes between parties since 1931, a study has found. With old party allegiances breaking down, as many as one in five Brits backed candidates just to oust ones they don’t like. At the same time, 22 million votes had no impact on the result, out of a total of 32,204,141 cast. 
The findings come in a study of the election result by the Electoral Reform Society. It has branded the June vote the “hold your nose” election before of the level of switching and tactical votes. The highest level of electoral volatility came two years ago at the 2015 general election.

NHS

Times
A new NHS scheme to help whistleblowers back into employment has been criticised as a “PR vehicle” before its launch. The nationwide pilot scheme, with a £100,000 budget, will offer career coaching, financial advice and mediation to staff who have suffered as a result of raising concerns. Sir Malcolm Grant, chairman of NHS England, said: “It is simply inexcusable that talented, experienced staff should be lost to the NHS as the result of raising the legitimate concerns that help the health service improve.” In a review into whistleblowing in the health service published in 2015, commissioned by Jeremy Hunt, Sir Robert Francis, QC, said: “Some individuals who have raised concerns experience severe difficulties when seeking re-employment in the health service.”

Armed forces

Times
The “funding challenge” in the armed forces is approaching £30 billion and troops may need to be cut to balance the books, says an industry consultant. Tensions created by the gap between the cost of new warships, fighter jets, submarines and armoured vehicles, and the money in the budget, are “acute and must be addressed”, Roland Sonnenberg, a senior partner at PwC, said. He described the next few years as “perhaps one of the most challenging periods in a generation” but hinted at reluctance within the MoD to acknowledge the scale of the problem. The comments in a blog posted on PwC’s website are the first time a senior figure from the defence industry has issued such a frank public warning.

National Trust

Times
Hunts could be banned from National Trust land in an unprecedented vote that has angered rural members, who accuse the charity of pandering to urban visitors. Fifty members of the trust, including Sir Ranulph Fiennes, the explorer, have endorsed a motion to stop trail hunting after video footage emerged of hunts killing stags on its estates. Trail hunting is where hounds and riders follow a scent that was laid earlier. Campaigners argue that the practice is used as a way of getting round the hunting ban. The motion will be debated at the charity’s annual meeting in October and would revoke all licences to hunt on trust land. Last year it issued 79 such licences.

Telegraph
The outgoing head of the National Trust has admitted that the organisation has alienated “traditional visitors” in the wake of rows over Easter egg hunts, gay pride badges and flapjacks.  Dame Helen Ghosh, who takes over as Master of Balliol College, Oxford University, next April, said that while Trust membership was healthy “sometimes some of our perhaps more traditional visitors have felt that they are not being catered for as they once felt that they were.” She told Radio 4’s The World This Weekend: “Sometimes I see signs that our places, or things going on, that perhaps tread too far in one direction than another.

Mail
The National Trust is so Left-leaning it’s like ‘the Blair government in exile’, leading art critic Sir Roy Strong said yesterday. The former director of London’s Victoria and Albert Museum and the National Portrait Gallery said the trust had become obsessed with a tick-box culture of ‘the disabled, the aged, LGBT and ethnic communities’ and had ‘got lost along the way’. It has become so dumbed down with its focus on ‘children, play areas and fun’ that it was ‘like a branch of the leisure industry’, he added. Sir Roy’s comments were made as it emerged the trust is set to continue promoting trendy causes. The charity came under fire this month after ‘outing’ the last squire of a stately home and forcing volunteers at the property to wear rainbow badges to promote gay rights. But in a message to staff about the furore at Felbrigg Hall in Norfolk, it has revealed it will turn its attention to women’s rights next year.

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