Fisheries

Telegraph
European Union fishing fleets must be given wide-ranging access to British coastal waters as the price of agreeing an all-UK Brexit divorce deal, the Telegraph can reveal. Senior EU diplomats have warned that any plan to grant the UK a temporary customs union to solve the Irish backstop problem must come with cast-iron guarantees that EU boats will be free to fish in UK waters. 
The EU demands threaten to re-open a fierce row inside the Tory party over the potential size of the Brexit dividend for coastal and fishing communities. Fishermen warned Mrs May that she must not “squander” the chance to claw back valuable quotas for British fleets.

Brexit

Express
THERESA May is expected to have further Brexit discussions with key European leaders today as speculation intensifies that a breakthrough will be made within days. Donald Tusk, who chairs the EU leaders’ group, added to hopes that talks on a deal between Britain and Brussels will reach a decisive point in the coming week. But senior UK Government sources and others sought to play down expectations. The Prime Minister will meet her Belgian counterpart and hold a private working lunch with French President Emmanuel Macron today when she takes part in ceremonies in Belgium and France to mark the end of the First World War 100 years ago.

Mail
Speculation is mounting that a Brexit deal will be unveiled on Monday – with a summit to seal the agreement at the end of the month. The EU commission is said to be planning for negotiations to conclude within days, despite bitter wrangling within the Cabinet over Irish border concessions. Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt has also insisted he is confident a package will be finalised over the next three weeks, potentially coinciding with the November 25 summit date circulating in Brussels – although he admitted the situation was ‘incredibly complicated’.

BBC News
Theresa May will probably lose a Commons vote on her Brexit deal, former Brexit Secretary David Davis has said. But Mr Davis – who quit his cabinet role over the Brexit plan in July said he believed defeat would prompt the UK and EU to agree a “better deal”. He also said the UK had hundreds of plans ready in case the country leaves the EU without any agreed Brexit deal. Mr Davis said there might be “some hiccups” but the UK was “a big country” and “we can look after ourselves”. Brexit is due to happen on 29 March 2019, as a result of the referendum in June 2016 in which people voted by 51.9% to 48.1% for the UK to leave the European Union.

UKIP
In an interview on BBC Radio 4 this morning, former Brexit Secretary David Davis said that Theresa May will probably lose a Commons vote on her Brexit deal. UKIP Leader Gerard Batten said:
“Mrs May sidelined Mr Davis when he was Brexit Secretary because she never had any intention of achieving a real Brexit. “I would not be surprised if the House of Commons voted against Mrs May’s plan – it angers both Leavers and Remainers. I suspect that this is a deliberate ploy so that the government will be forced to leave on WTO terms but then call for an emergency extension of Article 50 in order to extend ‘negotiations’ and the transition period. This should be seen for what it is – a plan for transitioning Britain back into the European Union in a few years time.

Sun
THERESA May’s Cabinet was plunged into fresh turmoil after pals of the Brexit Secretary launched an astonishing attack on the Prime Minister’s right hand man. Dominic Raab feels Cabinet Office boss David Lidington is “going behind his back” when dealing with the Irish government, allies say. Mr Lidington has been tasked with “hand holding” the Irish boss Leo Varadkar and Foreign Minister Simon Coveney through the final phases of negotiations, but Brexiteers believe he is using the role to push a softer agenda than the Exit Secretary. They point to a change in tone from the Dublin for Britain being able to stay in a customs union as part of the controversial “backstop” plan. The Sun understands tensions came to a head last week when Mr Lidington travelled to Dublin for meetings, while Mr Raab was dispatched to Northern Ireland.

Ireland

Mirror
Ireland has warned against assuming a breakthrough on the Brexit border row is imminent. Irish foreign minister Simon Coveney said that even if the UK Cabinet agrees exit plans in the coming days, the rest of the European Union must also back them. Senior ministers were invited to review the text of the withdrawal agreement that has so far been secured in negotiations with Brussels.The cabinet is poised to meet as soon as a deal is ready to be signed off. But Mr Coveney told the Irish Canada Business Association conference in Dublin: “I would urge caution that an imminent breakthrough is not necessarily to be taken for granted, not by a long shot.

Times
A Brussels plan to put a customs border in the Irish Sea if there is no Brexit agreement will be included in a divorce deal, a leaked letter from Theresa May suggests. The prime minister was accused last night of breaking her promise to the Democratic Unionist Party that she would never sign up to a deal that could allow Northern Ireland to be divided from the rest of the United Kingdom. The European plan, known as the “backstop to the backstop”, would leave Northern Ireland tied to the single market and customs union if Brexit talks collapse. Brussels wants this insurance policy to avoid a hard border in Ireland.

Independent
Theresa May has warned her DUP allies that a customs border in the Irish sea may be written into the UK’s Brexit divorce deal, according to reports. In a leaked letter, the prime minister tells unionist leader Arlene Foster that Brussels is pushing for the measure as a so-called “backstop to the backstop” on Northern Ireland’s customs status in case negotiations break down. Ms May wants a deal containing a backstop measure creating a temporary “joint customs territory” with the EU for the whole of the UK. But the bloc appears to be insisting on a fallback proposal aimed at avoiding a hard border between Ireland and the UK.

Westmonster
The DUP have warned Theresa May that any backstop which involves Northern Ireland being closer to the EU economically will not be acceptable. DUP MP and Brexit spokesperson Sammy Wilson said: “We don’t regard it as palatable, it would be totally unacceptable and breach any promise that was made of not breaking up the UK. “She knows the consequences.” The DUP’s Cheif Whip Sir Jeffery Donaldson also weighed in saying: “If we think a Brexit deal is not good for the UK, we will say so. We have been very clear of that. “We want the deal to be in the best interests of the UK. Let’s see what the deal is – we’re not afraid of a General Election.”

Sky News
A senior DUP MP has accused Theresa May of a “total betrayal” amid suggestions a plan for a customs border down the Irish Sea could yet be included in a Brexit divorce deal. East Antrim MP Sammy Wilson attacked the prime minister following the emergence of leaked letter from Mrs May to DUP leader Arlene Foster and her deputy Nigel Dodds. In extracts published by The Times, the prime minister’s letter refers to EU demands for the proposed Brexit backstop arrangement to avoid a hard border on the island of Ireland. This would apply if a future EU-UK trade relationship failed to avert a hardening of the frontier between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland.

Express
IRELAND has poured cold water on speculation of an imminent breakthrough in the Brexit talks and insisted a no deal divorce is still a very real possibility. Irish foreign minister Simon Coveney warned against assuming a withdrawal agreement will be signed off by the European Union just because the deal receives the backing of Theresa May’s Cabinet. Yesterday the Prime Minister’s inner circle were invited to review parts of the draft text which have already been agreed with Brussels and reports suggest EU leaders will meet at the end of November for an emergency Brexit summit. The divorce deal is said to be 95 percent complete and the Irish border conundrum is the final hurdle to overcome.

BBC News
The UK must have the power to end any post-Brexit “backstop” customs accord with the EU on its own, International Trade Secretary Liam Fox has said. The Brexiteer said the UK had voted to leave the EU and “that decision can’t be subcontracted to somebody else”. The UK and EU want to avoid a hard Irish border after Brexit but cannot agree on how to do so. The EU has said it cannot agree to any arrangements which could be left unilaterally by the UK. Prime Minister Theresa May is keen to reach a withdrawal agreement with the EU this month.

Guardian
Eurosceptic Conservative MPs will still vote down the government’s Brexit deal even if Theresa May negotiates an exit clause from the Irish backstop, the former minister Steve Baker has insisted. May’s cabinet has been locked in a bitter internal wrangle about whether, and how, the government could extricate itself from the backstop, with some ministers concerned her plans could leave the UK in a permanent limbo. The prime minister hopes to win the backing of her ministers for a draft withdrawal agreement at a special cabinet meeting likely to take place early next week. But Baker, a leading figure in the backbench European Research Group (ERG), said Conservative MPs would be closely scrutinising the accompanying political declaration setting out the framework for the UK’s future trading relationship with the EU27.

EU

Telegraph (by Ambrose Evans-Pritchard)
The EU has no legal means to force the capitulation of Italy’s rebel government and the budget showdown is likely to escalate until there is a market crisis, warned a veteran euro fire-fighter. Vitor Constancio, the European Central Bank’s former financial stability chief, said the high-stakes clash with Italy is extremely difficult to handle and Brussels is effectively powerless against a net contributor to the EU budget. There is no mechanism to compel compliance by the Lega-Five Star insurgents other than a blow-up in the bond markets.

Cap X
During Britain’s EU referendum, Remain campaigners liked to claim that the case for Leaving didn’t just depend on false promises about life after the EU, but also on outlandish claims about the ambitions of EU federalists. The biggest lie was apparently that there would ever be a European army. The most trenchant dismissal of that idea came from Nick Clegg, who in 2014 described the idea as “a dangerous fantasy”. The notion was, according to the then Deputy Prime Minister, was so far-fetched it was on a par with the idea that “the moonlanding was faked, that Barack Obama wasn’t American and that Elvis isn’t dead”. If it is a far-fetched idea, it is now also one that has the backing of the President of France. “We will not protect the Europeans unless we decide to have a true European army,” Emmanuel Macron said on Tuesday.

Independent
Brussels has released data showing it expects Britain to have the weakest growth in the EU over the next two years, heaping pressure on Theresa May as she seeks their agreement for a Brexit deal. European Commission officials warned that the UK’s economy will slump even if Brexit is smooth, while a disordered withdrawal would pull the country’s forecasts down even more severely. The move to highlight the dire consequences of a messy Brexit come just as British negotiators try to convince their counterparts in Brussels that they are ready to strike both a withdrawal deal and come to an agreement on a future relationship.

Scotland

Guardian
Scotland’s highest court has refused the UK government leave to appeal its referral of a case to the European court of justice that seeks to establish whether the UK can unilaterally stop Brexit. This paves the way for the case to be heard in Luxembourg later this month. The case has been brought by a cross-party group of six Scottish MPs, MEPs and MSPs, along with Jolyon Maugham QC, the director of the Good Law Project, who helped arrange the case after a crowdfunding appeal. They want the ECJ to offer a definitive ruling on whether the UK can halt the article 50 process without needing the approval of the 27 other EU member states.

Labour Party

Independent
Theresa May is “bluffing” about leaving the EU without a deal and would not take Britain over the cliff edge if her agreement with Brussels was rejected by MPs, Labour’s Brexit chief has said. Speaking to
The Independent on a visit to Brussels Keir Starmer said no deal was simply not a “viable” option for any British prime minister and that he simply did not believe Ms May would lead the UK into such a catastrophe. “I have never accepted that no deal is a viable option. The consequences of no deal would be catastrophic for jobs, the economy and for the border in Northern Ireland,” he said while visiting EU officials in the Belgian capital. “I honestly don’t believe any prime minister would seriously consider taking the decision to crash the UK out of the EU without an agreement.

Sun
A LEADING Corbyn supporter has sparked fury by mocking the poppy appeal – calling for the Royal British Legion to be binned. Aaron Bastani, a far-left commentator known as one of Jeremy Corbyn’s “attack dogs”, even claimed that commemorating dead soldiers is RACIST. Labour moderates including deputy leader Tom Watson hit back and accused him of deliberately trying to offend voters. Mr Bastani runs a website called Novara Media where he pumps out aggressive videos pushing Mr Corbyn’s message. He used the run-up to Armistice Day this week to criticise the poppy appeal and the Royal British Legion.

Mail
Senior Labour figures have called for a far-left journalist dubbed Jeremy Corbyn’s ‘attack dog’ to be thrown out of the party after he condemned the Poppy Appeal as ‘racist’. Aaron Bastani, whose site Novara Media has been key in galvanising youth support among Corbyn’s Labour, labelled the Royal British Legion appeal ‘grotesque’ and called for the charity to be shut down. His views were quickly denounced by leading Labour figures, including deputy leader Tom Watson, who called the comments ‘disrespectful’. The scathing attack against the Poppy Appeal, which raises millions for military veterans and their loved ones, comes on the centenary anniversary of the First World War which claimed the lives of more than one million Britons.

Times
Labour is in talks with a former Conservative peer to lead an inquiry into a four-day week as it explores radical ways to win over voters. Lord Skidelsky, 79, an economist, has been approached by John McDonnell, the shadow chancellor, to lead the inquiry. The peer sits on the crossbenches in the House of Lords and has also been a member of Labour and the Social Democratic Party. Supporters of a four-day week argue that advances in technology mean staff should be able to work less without a cut in pay as technology improves workplace efficiency. They say that workers should reap the benefits of greater automation and the increased use of artificial intelligence, not just bosses and shareholders.

Breitbart
Labour has defended inviting a notorious Islamist preacher to appear at a party event, claiming that collaboration with “faith groups” is an “essential part of the fight against the scourge of racism”. Shakeel Begg was listed as a speaker along with two of the party’s MPs, Janet Daby and Vicky Foxcroft at a Lewisham Labour Against Racism event Tuesday night, where activists discussed plans to “oppose Islamophobia and anti-Semitism”, “stop Tommy Robinson”, and to “challenge” government policies which make it harder for illegal immigrants to thrive in Britain. An imam at the Lewisham Islamic Centre, which was attended by the terrorist killers of Fusilier Lee Rigby, Begg lost a libel case against the BBC in 2016 when a judge ruled he “clearly promotes and encourages violence in support of Islam and espouses a series of extremist Islamic positions”.

NHS

Telegraph
Face-to-face hospital appointments will be axed to save the environment, amid warnings that five per cent of all traffic is now caused by the NHS. Health officials said the current model of hospital care is “no longer fit for purpose” – warning of “potentially painful, uncomfortable or disruptive” changes ahead to bring the service into the 21st century. Prof Stephen Powis, medical director of the NHS said it was time to “grasp the nettle” and cut thousands of needless hospital appointments, instead offfering patients a slot via methods like Skype. He backed a report by the Royal College of Physicians which today suggests that face-to-face consultations should no longer be the default option.

High Streets

Telegraph
High street shops closed at a rate of around 14 a day in the first half of the year, while openings were down a third, a report suggests. Retailers are battling the worst trading conditions for five years, with the growth of internet shopping and business rates blamed for the challenging climate. The rise of “in-home leisure” – people preferring to spend free time and entertain at home rather than go out and about – is also suspected of taking a bite out of earnings. Italian restaurants including Jamie Oliver’s chain are said to have been particularly badly hit by the change, while retailers such as Toys R Us and Maplin have gone to the wall as more people shop online.

ITV News
High street shops closed at a rate of around 14 a day in the first half of the year, while openings were down a third, a report suggests. Retailers are battling the worst trading conditions for five years, with the growth of internet shopping and business rates blamed for the challenging climate. The rise of “in-home leisure” – people preferring to spend free time and entertain at home rather than go out and about – is also suspected of taking a bite out of earnings. Italian restaurants including Jamie Oliver’s chain are said to have been particularly badly hit by the change, while retailers such as Toys R Us and Maplin have gone to the wall as more people shop online.

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