Well, it looks like we Brexiteers have been sold down the river again.  Apparently, the word coming from the Prime Minister’s country retreat is that Brexit doesn’t mean Brexit, or it means BINO (Brexit In Name Only).  To my mind that leaves a huge gap in the political spectrum for those who, like me, feel that a clean break from the EU is just about the most important matter at hand at the moment.

If we are no longer an EU member state, we all know the advantages: of controlling our borders, setting our own taxes, trading with countries all over the world and not having to contribute to that huge behemoth that simply swallows our cash – or is it Jean-Claude Juncker who is swallowing our cash in the form of fine red wines?

Of course, whatever deal is reached by May with her Cabinet will be spun as a success and a wonderful opportunity for the UK.  OK, she’ll say, we have to still accept millions of migrants from the Continent, but they’ll be very good for our country. OK, we’ll still have to pay Brussels millions of pounds a year to belong to the club, but we’ll be able to trade with them.  OK, we won’t be able to trade with other parts of the world but we’ll increase our trade with the EU. OK, we won’t get all our fishing waters back but our quotas will be increased (from 10 percent to 12 percent?). OK, we’ll still be under the jurisdiction of the Court of Human Rights but they make some very good decisions – sometimes.  OK, we’ll have to introduce border checkpoints between Northern Ireland and Eire but goods will still be able to move through. .. hey, hold on there a moment. Members of the DUP, on whose support May relies, are not going to be happy about that. If they refuse to agree to these terms, May will lose the vote on this deal. And then what happens?  Back to the drawing board?

It’s true that we don’t yet know if the deal we reach with the EU will be bad or good, because we haven’t reached a deal yet.  The bloc’s chief negotiator is very fond of saying: “Non!” to every suggestion put to him. He’s pushing and pushing but if the agreement May has managed to thrash out with her cabinet is still met with a negative Gallic grunt, where will she go?  What will she do? Perhaps our only hope is the EU itself and, ironically, we may even be saved by Barnier if he, as seems quite likely, rejects this deal. But if that happens, will she concede more and more in the knowledge that the point she has reached is already far too much for the likes of Jacob Rees-Mogg, Michael Gove and David Davis?  

If she does, there will be a huge political hole for those who recognise that leaving the EU is vital for the prosperity of our nation.  Where will the disgruntled Leave voters go? If they’re from Labour Leave, they won’t vote Conservative in a month of Sundays; if they’re disenfranchised Tories, no way will they join Jeremy Corbyn’s party.

UKIP must be ready to encourage Brexiteers from both wings of the political spectrum to join us.  But what can we offer them? A website that is being redesigned but is in a dire state at the moment; press releases that come out every couple of weeks or so (they should be out every single day!); a newsletter that comes out once in a blue moon; communications from Head Office that offer only one message – give us money!  Why would anyone want to join us?

Because we are UKIP, that’s why!  And it was UKIP which fought to secure a referendum, a referendum which, despite dirty tricks from the Remainers, we won!  We all remember the £9 million leaflet that Cameron arranged to be sent to every home, promising that the government would implement the result of the referendum and if we voted to leave, we would leave.  What price trust in government if we don’t actually leave?

If we reach a bad deal, as it now looks likely, our former leader, so charismatic but now so long gone, has promised to come back to front-line politics.  Does that mean he’ll rejoin UKIP or form another party? There was talk many moons ago of Aaron Banks funding a brand new political party. That came to nought, I believe, but is this still a possibility?  Perhaps we should all leave UKIP and join the new party – if and when it gets off the ground!

There has been talk on this site of only one outcome – revolution.  The message came in a religious post and asked the question whether or not Christians and Muslims could ever live together.  I would like to think so but I’m not sure, but the correspondent who discussed this felt the Quran and the Bible were so far apart that it could well be a possibility.  Maybe so, but I think that long before that there will be riots in the streets if the government doesn’t do what it promised and take us out of the EU.

I guess the next thing is a campaign of civil disobedience, with millions of us refusing to pay our council tax or fines after we are penalised for doing so.  It takes a real leader to be the first one to do that sort of thing in the hope that others will follow. Do we have such a leader?

 

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