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Sunday papers – 18 June 2017

Brexit

Talks start in Europe tomorrow and the Express reports that David Davis will talk tough.

BREXIT Secretary David Davis will enter tomorrow’s negotiations telling the EU there is “no doubt” we are leaving despite European leaders’ attempts to leave open the door to Britain reversing the referendum result.
In a slap down to Cabinet colleagues who want a softer 
Brexit, Mr Davis said he was heading to the first official talks “on a mission to deliver on the will of the British people”.
After 10 months of planning, Mr Davis will meet the EU’s chief negotiator Michel Barnier to agree the structure of the negotiations so officials have a framework in which to discuss substantive issues.
Confident of a “positive outcome”, Mr Davis said yesterday: “As I head to Brussels to open official talks to leave the 
EU, there should be no doubt – we are leaving the European Union and delivering on that historic referendum result.

In his usual column for the Times, Boris Johnson writes of the ‘goodwill’ on both sides.

Tomorrow morning the negotiations at last begin in Brussels on a process which — if done right — can present huge opportunities for this country. David Davis and his colleagues will sit down opposite our EU friends and partners, and begin to hammer out a new deal.
I believe it will be a great settlement between Britain and the EU, one that will end the bickering and resistance that has marked so much of our relationship over the last few decades.
If we get it right (and there is much more goodwill on both sides than you might think), then we can end up with a deep and special partnership with the EU.

Reuters claims the talks will be firm but the prospect of staying in the EU will be available to UK negotiators.

The European Union will be “amicable and firm” with Britain in Brexit negotiations due to start on Monday, and all possible options are on the table, the EU’s Economic and Financial Affairs Commissioner Pierre Moscovici said.
“On Brexit, we will be neither ‘hard’, nor ‘soft’, but amicable and firm,” Moscovici told the Sunday edition of French weekly Journal du Dimanche.
“All the scenarios are on the table, including that of no agreement on March 29, 2019. But this is not the one we prefer,” he said.
French President Emmanuel Macron and German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble made similar comments this week, saying the door to staying in the EU remained open to Britain so long as exit negotiations had not been concluded.

But it seems the Chancellor is planning a soft Brexit, says Breitbart.

Britain’s Chancellor Phillip Hammond is drafting detailed plans for a “soft Brexit” whereby Britain will retain associate membership of the single market, foregoing the opportunity to forge her own bilateral trade deals.
Under his bespoke plans, Mr Hammond hopes Britain would be able to strike independent deals on trade involving services, Whitehall insiders have told 
The Telegraph.
But he believes that Britain should sacrifice its ability to negotiate deals on the trade of goods, insisting that remaining within the European single market on an associate membership basis would protect British jobs.
“The UK would negotiation associate membership of the customs union but keep the freedom to negotiate on services – which is the much more important part of the UK economy,” said a source.

Hammond could be disappointed, says Guido.

Theresa May and Liam Fox have confirmed the UK will leave the customs union by hiring a globally respected Chief Negotiation Adviser. Crawford Falconer is a New Zealander with 25 years of experience at negotiating trade deals. His job will be to “develop and negotiate free trade agreements and market access deals with non-EU countries”. An important moment in the ongoing battle for Brexit: striking trade deals would not be possible if Britain were to remain in the customs union. Sorry Phil, bad news for opportunistic Remainers…

And the Guardian claims the PM is under pressure to soften our withdrawal terms.

Senior business figures have heaped further pressure on Theresa May to change course for a softer Brexit in the wake of the election, amid fresh warnings of the impact of immigration controls and leaving the single market.
Stuart Rose, the Tory peer and chairman of online grocer Ocado, who backed Remain, said the election had been a “proxy re-referendum” against hard Brexit.
Karan Bilimoria, the founder of Cobra beer and Remain backer, said the prime minister had “zero credibility” and that Britain could now rethink leaving. And Brian McBride, chairman of ASOS and Wiggle, has raised concerns about access to labour and customs checks.

Theresa May

The Prime Minister’s position is not very secure, says the Telegraph.

Theresa May will face a “stalking horse” challenge to topple her as Prime Minister if she waters down Brexit, senior Tories have warned.
Leading Eurosceptic MPs have told 
The Telegraph they are prepared to mount an immediate leadership challenge if Mrs May deviates from her original plan.
The revelation comes after a torrid week for the Prime Minister in which she faced fierce criticism for her handling of the Grenfell Tower catastrophe.
Conservative MPs – including Cabinet ministers – have concluded that Mrs May cannot lead them into the next election and they are now discussing when she could go.
Eurosceptic MPs have warned that any attempt to keep Britain in the customs union and single market or any leeway for the European Court of Justice to retain an oversight function will trigger an “overnight” coup.

The Times also has the story.

Conservative sharks are circling after the prime minister suffered yet another disastrous week.
Theresa May’s cabinet realised her authority was shot when a middle-ranking minister rambled into the third minute of his comments about Brexit talks at a meeting of her top team last week. Where once a telling glare from the prime minister would have silenced the plodder, in the aftermath of the Tory election setback all ministers are allowed to bore for Britain.
An exasperated cabinet minister said: “The dynamics have changed and now everyone feels they are going to have their say. None of them is adding any value, quite frankly. It’s so they are quoted in the minutes. If there was a psychologist sat in our meetings, they would have a field day studying the insecurities of the whole lot of them.”

The Mail claims her attitude over last week’s terrible fire has weakened her position.

Theresa May was fighting for her political life on two fronts last night as she apologised for her response to the Grenfell Tower fire while facing an MPs’ rebellion over Brexit.
After days of mounting criticism over her handling of the fatal blaze, Mrs May admitted that the response to families needing support ‘was not good enough’.
Her statement was billed by a No 10 source as a ‘mea culpa’. But her critics described it as a ‘belated act of contrition’ which was itself ‘not good enough’.

But the Sun claims it’s all about Brexit.

THERESA May faces a leadership challenge if she backtracks on a hard Brexit pledge as Tories warn she has “10 days to save herself”, it’s reported.
Senior ministers are said to be preparing to demand a vote of no confidence after concluding Mrs May cannot lead them into the next election.

Some threatened a “stalking horse” scenario – whereby a candidate is put up against the PM, in a plot likened to Sir Anthony Meyer’s 1989 challenge against Margaret Thatcher, according to the Telegraph.
An influential former minister told the newspaper: “What we would do is to put up a candidate to run against her, a stalking horse. You can imagine who would do it.”

The Times claims May has just 10 days to do something about this situation.

Theresa May has 10 days to save her premiership after she was put on notice to “shape up” and show she is fit to lead.
Confidence in the prime minister is in free fall in Tory ranks as constituency party bosses told ministers and MPs to force her from power. Up to a dozen MPs are ready to demand a vote of no confidence in May by submitting letters to the backbench 1922 committee.
Their ranks are expected to swell this weekend as MPs consult grassroots grandees about May’s faltering response to the Grenfell Tower inferno in west London.

And the Star also claims she could be out within days.

PRIME Minister Theresa May could be ousted within days as cabinet ministers are reportedly clubbing together to get rid of her.
Boris Johnson has been pressed by five other members of the cabinet to oust Theresa May as PM.
The Foreign Secretary was contacted by ministers on Friday morning who told him they would support him if wants to depose May.
“A handful of senior people have pledged their loyalty to Boris at cabinet level,” a source told the Sunday Times.
“He has been inundated with messages of support.

Grenfell fire

As a mark of respect for those who lost their lives in the tower block fire last week, a minute’s silence will be held tomorrow, says the Mail.

A minute’s silence will be held to remember the victims of the Grenfell tragedy.
All Government buildings will mark the silence, at 11am on Monday, and other organisations may also observe it.
The announcement came as Theresa May admitted the support for Grenfell Tower families in the immediate aftermath of the fire was ‘not good enough’, with police revealing that 58 people are missing and presumed dead.
The Prime Minister said there had been ‘huge frustrations’ on the ground as people struggled to find information.
She added: ‘The response of the emergency services, NHS and the community has been heroic.

And the Star reports plans for a huge demo.

A PROTEST march dubbed the “Day of Rage” is being planned promising to “shut down London” as people demand justice for Grenfell Tower disaster.
Demonstrators have encouraged people to pull sick days, walk out of school, or take the day off work to flood the streets of the capital in a furious march against Theresa May’s government.
Organisers claim the event will “shut down London” in an outpouring of anger over last Wednesday’s deadly blaze.
At least 58 people are missing feared dead after the inferno which tore through a block of flats in Kensington, west London.

But the demo could be highjacked by the far left, warns Breitbart.

Far left, open borders campaign group ‘Movement for Justice’ (MFJ) have announced a ‘Day of Rage’ to “shut down London” in response to the Grenfell Tower tragedy, declaring that “there will be no peace until this government is brought down.”
In flyers advertising the event — at which the left wing group plans to march on Parliament during the Queen’s speech on Wednesday — MFJ blames “racism” for the deadly fire which police say claimed 30 lives, with 70 people still missing, and accuses authorities of a “cover up”.

Queen’s speech

The State Opening of Parliament on Wednesday could be the last for two years, says the Telegraph.

Theresa May has cancelled the 2018 Queen’s Speech to smooth the path for Brexit reforms as a deal with the DUP hangs in the balance.
The Prime Minister announced that a two-year parliamentary session will be launched on Wednesday rather than the traditional one-year session.
The step breaks with historical precedence and was last taken in the early days of the Coalition as it scrambled to create stable government in 2010.
Government sources last night insisted the move was planned before the election and would give time for laws needed for Brexit to be fully debated. 

The Independent also reports the plans.

Wednesday’s Queen’s speech will be the last until 2019, as Parliament has decided it will sit for two years rather than the usual one, to allow extra time for Brexit legislation to pass through the Commons and the Lords.
Theresa May has taken the extremely unusual step of doubling the length of the next parliamentary session, in recognition of the volume and complexity of the Brexit related legislation that will have to pass through it to prepare the country for its exit from the European Union.
The Government has already outlined its plans to introduce a Great Repeal Bill, which will convert existing EU law into UK law, but Whitehall sources have indicated this will require up to nine separate acts of Parliament, covering everything from trade to air traffic control. That the Conservatives do not have an overall majority in parliament will make this already daunting task significantly more difficult.

ITV News claims it’s because of Brexit.

Parliament will sit for a double-length two year term to ensure that it delivers Brexit, the Government has announced.
Next year’s Queen’s Speech will be scrapped under plans designed to ease the way for a raft of laws taking the UK out of the European Union.
The highly unusual change was announced by Andrea Leadsom, the Leader of the House of Commons.
She said the move would allow MPs and peers more time to scrutinise legislation around Brexit.

The Guardian also has the story.

Next year’s Queen’s speech is being ditched by the government to ease the way in parliament for new Brexit laws.
In a highly unusual move, the parliamentary session is being doubled to two years. The leader of the Commons, Andrea Leadsom, said this would give MPs and peers the maximum time possible to scrutinise legislation taking the UK out of the European Union. It means the government will not put forward a new legislative programme next year.
The Conservatives delayed this year’s Queen’s speech as the party held discussions with the DUP to thrash out an agreement on propping up the minority government. A formal deal has yet to be secured but Tory sources have said there is a “broad agreement” on the principles of the speech, and state opening will now take place on Wednesday 21 June – two days later than originally scheduled.

The Express claims it will firm up the PM’s authority.

THERESA May has strengthened her fragile grip on power by scrapping next year’s Queen’s Speech.
The Government has taken the rare step of doubling the length of a normal parliamentary session from one year to two, meaning there will be no State Opening of Parliament next year.
The move, which the Prime Minister’s aides insist is to allow for more scrutiny of Brexit legislation, removes one of the biggest risks of a leadership challenge.
If a prime minister cannot pass a Queen’s Speech or budget through Parliament, then they are automatically subject to a vote of no confidence, which could trigger a general election.

French elections

The Telegraph looks across the Channel to today’s elections in France.

Drug lords barely out of their teens often resort to kalashnikovs to carve out territory in Marseille, but a key political battle is also being waged beneath its decrepit tower blocks.
One of Emmanuel Macron’s first big challenges as president is to push through controversial labour reforms in an attempt to end France’s jobs-for-life culture against stiff opposition from militant trade unions. Street protests could break out after the return from summer holidays in September.
The parliamentary elections on Sunday are expected to hand the president’s party a crushing majority, although low turnout meant that only 14 per cent of registered voters cast ballots for the movement in the first round last week.
The elections are likely to give an opposition platform to the far-Left populist, Jean-Luc Mélenchon, on course to win a central constituency in Marseille.

Dolphins

Fishing boats could be the cause of hundreds of dead dolphins, says the Times.

Cornwall’s famous dolphin population is being wiped out by fishing boats, say scientists investigating the discovery of 1,000 dead animals on British and French beaches this spring.
They found that almost all the dolphins bore fatal injuries inflicted by fishing gear and estimate that the bodies of another 3,000 did not reach shore — a total death toll of 4,000.
The seas off Cornwall are home to one of Europe’s biggest populations of dolphin, which are renowned for putting on displays off tourist beaches and joining surfers riding the waves. They roam from the southern Irish Sea to the Bay of Biscay.

Apocalypse

And, of course, the Star has today’s apocalyptic story.

FEARS the apocalyptic Yellowstone volcano is awakening has intensified after a powerful earthquake struck the region.
A 4.5 magnitude shaker struck Yellowstone Magnitude Park on Thursday, according to data from the US Geological Survey.
Earthquakes in the area are not rare – with 1,500 to 2,000 hitting the area every year – but the latest incident was the only one this year reported by USGS.
Scientists say Thursday’s earthquake was part of the swarm hitting the area since Monday.
Yellowstone volcano, located in the US state of Wyoming, is one of the most feared on the planet and described as a “ticking time bomb” – with various scientists claiming its eruption could be catastrophic.
Experts have long claimed the so-called “super volcano” could wipe out the entire planet.

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Debbie
About Debbie (585 Articles)
Debbie has been a journalist for longer than she cares to admit! She has been freelance for the last 15 years and is an associate editor on UKIP Daily, specialising in covering the morning press each day.

6 Comments on Sunday papers – 18 June 2017

  1. Re what happened in the early hours of this morning, why are people so surprised this has now happened?

    • Because they’re hypocrites, DD, not really ‘surprised’ at all. They’d rather do the shock-horror, how awful, virtue-signalling thing.

  2. Whether May stays on or some other Tory replaces her, please, please, get rid of Philip Hammond. He has been a stumbling-block for Brexit since the word go, and I’m sick of hearing about what HE wants to see in terms of leaving/not leaving the EU.
    A huge number of voters told him what THEY wanted in last year’s referendum. Chancellors will come and go, but the people are the real masters, politicians their servants, therefore Hammond needs the boot if he can’t bring himself to respect that. Let K Clarke accompany him while they’re at it.

  3. We didn’t vote for ‘a deep and special partnership with the EU’ Mr. Johnson. We voted for independence. We voted so that each successive parliament, voted in by us, could decide at the time, what sort of relationship we then had with the EU and all the other countries in the world.

    We voted to preserve our democracy. We voted to not be subsumed into a totalitarian Marxist state.

    Mrs. May never told us, or you, what Brexit means.

    So now it’s time for us to tell you.

    Brexit means independence.

    Full and complete independence. Nothing more and most certainly nothing less.

    • Spot on, MK. This ‘deep and special relationship’ stuff is so mawkish, squelchy and schmaltzy that you need a sick bucket to hand every time May, Boris & Co mention it.
      I N D E P E N D E N C E – spell it out for the thick Remainers and the not-so-Leavy Leavers.

      Why should we want a ‘deep’relationship’ with a continent that has caused us and the world so much bloody trouble all through history? We should be glad our bit broke off millennia ago, celebrate that and close that damned Tunnel. Keep Europe at arm’s length and don’t go making any more treaties to defend any part of it: that’s what cost us so dear in WW1 & WWII. Don’t the politicians ever learn? It seems not.

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