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Sunday papers – 1 May 2016

Immigration

The Sun has an interesting piece which claims that immigrants are coming into the UK in comfort.

GANGS are smuggling hundreds of migrants, including terrorists, into the UK on rented passports and in luxury cars.

Wealthy foreigners pay the traffickers up to £10,000-a-head for the service.

One smuggler has earned £700,000 in a few months.

The scam led to Thursday’s 125mph chase in Belgium and France in which cops shot suspected smugglers in an Audi.

The Sun claims immigration is badly affecting schools.

SCHOOLS are being pushed to breaking point by soaring numbers of children of EU migrants.

Nearly 700,000 kids in UK classrooms have a parent who is a citizen of another European country.

That is twice the 2007 total — and it puts schools under “huge and unsustainable pressure”, a minister warned last night.

It has triggered overcrowded classrooms and puts a strain on numbers of pupil places available.

A report on the immigration impact by Government statistics chief John Pullinger shows one in every 15 schoolkids either moved here with their parents or was born in the UK after one or both migrated from their home countries.

Corruption

ITV News previews a speech by the Prime Minister David Cameron in which he will claim that he will prioritise international corruption.

David Cameron will put tackling corruption at the “top of the international agenda”, he said ahead of a London summit on the issue.

The international anti-corruption summit – the first of its kind – is aimed at exposing, punishing and drive out global corruption.

Prior to the summit, the Prime Minister described corruption as “the root of so many of the world’s problems”.

Among those he cited corruption as fuelling terrorism.

World leaders attending the summit include the presidents Ashraf Ghani of Afghanistan, Juan Manuel Santos of Colombia, Muhammadu Buhari of Nigeria and Norwegian prime minister Erna Solberg.

BBC News has a similar story.

Prime Minister David Cameron has said he wants to put tackling corruption at the “top of the international agenda” ahead of a London summit on the issue.

The international anti-corruption summit – the first of its kind – is aimed at exposing, punishing and drive out global corruption.

Political leaders, businesses, sporting organisations, and charities will meet at Lancaster House on Thursday.

Mr Cameron says corruption is “the root of so many of the world’s problems”.

He also described it as “an enemy of progress”.

“It destroys jobs and holds back economic growth, traps the poorest in desperate poverty, and undermines our security by pushing people towards extremist groups,” he added.

“The battle against corruption will not be won overnight. It will take time, courage and determination to deliver the reforms that are necessary. But we cannot hope to solve the major global challenges we face without tackling the exploitation, fraud and dishonesty at their heart.

Brexit

The Express claims the Prime Minister will tell voters to vote to remain in the EU.

DAVID Cameron will tell voters tomorrow to reject Brexit if they love their country, as he sets out the “big, bold patriotic case” to remain in the EU.

The Prime Minister will claim in a speech that Britain will be safer and stronger inside the EU.

His comments will be interpreted as a direct challenge to Justice Secretary Michael Gove, who suggested yesterday that Britain would be safer after Brexit.

Mr Cameron will say: “I want to set out the big, bold patriotic case for Britain to remain a member of the EU.

EU

The Express reports that the EU president has slated Europeans for ‘listening to the wishes of their own people’.

JEAN-CLAUDE Juncker has issued a thinly-veiled broadside to Britain’s democracy, accusing politicians of being “part-time Europeans” who listen to their voters too much.

In an outspoken address the EU chief accused “some of our colleagues” of listening to the wishes of their own people rather than pandering to the vested interests of the Brussels elite.

Mr Juncker claimed the “highly exciting” period which led to the catastrophic decision to create the Euro was now “totally gone” and had been replaced by division caused by certain countries wanting to look after their own people rather than the EU project.

His comments may be interpreted as a poorly disguised attack on David Cameron and Britain, which is holding a referendum on its membership of the 28-nation bloc on June 23.

They are also likely to alarm pro-democracy campaigners after providing yet further evidence of the EU’s lurch towards federal centralisation and away from respecting the the rights of individual member states’ right to self-determination.

The Vote Leave campaign blasted: “Juncker sees democracy as an inconvenience for his European Project.”

Racism

Breitbart has discovered that the BBC is advertising for non-white prospective recruits.

A range of British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) television departments, programmes, and radio stations are currently offering highly desirable, paid internships, but white people are prohibited from applying.

Creative Access – an organisation, registered as a charity, which offers placements at “many of the UK’s top media organisations” – has listed a number of BBC placements on its website, demanding applicants are only from “Black, Asian and non-white minority ethnic backgrounds”.

The website’s list of opportunities shows that all but four of the positions currently available are for jobs at the publicly-funded BBC, and Creative Access is funded by the British tax payer despite its charity status.

HS2

The Mail claims the proposed rail line may damage a historic house.

A descendant of the founder of world-famous department store Liberty is battling to save the country house the family has owned for generations from the ravages of Britain’s new high-speed rail line.

HS2 is scheduled to pass just 800 yards from 500-year-old Field End Grange, a Tudor-era cottage in the village of The Lee in Buckinghamshire, owned by businessman Richard Stewart-Liberty.

The house, worth £1.5 million, was bought in 1890 by his great-great-uncle, Sir Arthur Liberty, who made his fortune after founding the London store that became famous for its fabric prints.
But it is threatened by the route of the controversial new London-Birmingham rail route through the Chiltern Hills.

Doctors’ action

ITV News reports that further talks are to be held between the BMA and the government.

The British Medical Association (BMA) has agreed to re-enter negotiations with the government over junior doctor contracts.

This follows a proposal by the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges calling for negotiations to restart.

The BMA has agreed to re-enter talks with the government on outstanding issues in this dispute, which include, but are not limited to, unsocial hours.

Junior doctors’ concerns extend far beyond pay, and our principle in talks will be to deliver a fair contract that does not discriminate against women or any other group, one which addresses the recruitment and retention crisis in the NHS and which provides the basis for delivering a world-class health service.

The BMA will also call for any contract offer – agreed or not – to be put to a referendum of junior doctors, as is usual following a contract negotiation.

We hope that with both parties back around the negotiating table, real progress can now be made to ending this dispute through talks.

– DR JOHANN MALAWANA, BMA JUNIOR DOCTOR COMMITTEE CHAIR

BBC News also covers the talks.

Junior doctor representatives at the British Medical Association (BMA) will meet later to decide whether to hold talks with the government over a disputed new NHS employment contract.

Negotiations over the contract broke down in February and junior doctors have staged several strikes since then.

Ministers said on Thursday they would re-start talks if they could focus on Saturday pay and unsocial hours.

The Academy of Medical Royal Colleges says there should be no preconditions.

The government says it is willing to pause the introduction of the junior doctors’ contract in England for five days to allow for talks.

The BMA agreed in principle to the idea of restarting talks and also to a possible deferral of any new threat of strikes for five days.

As does Sky News.

The British Medical Association has agreed to re-enter talks with the Government on Monday over a controversial new contract for junior doctors.

Johann Malawana, the chairman of the BMA’s junior doctors committee, said he hopes “real progress” can be made towards ending the dispute, which last month led to the first all-out strike in NHS history.

“The BMA has agreed to re-enter talks with the Government on outstanding issues in this dispute, which include, but are not limited to, unsocial hours,” Dr Malawana said.

“Junior doctors’ concerns extend far beyond pay, and our principle in talks will be to deliver a fair contract that does not discriminate against women or any other group.

The Mirror covers the story.

The British Medical Association has agreed to re-enter talks with the Government over the junior doctors’ contract, it has been reported.

In a letter to the government, BMA junior doctors committee (JDC) chair wrote: “Today JDC decided to resume negotiations with Government on a new contract for junior doctors.

Junior doctors leave posters on gates outside King’s College hospital on April 27, 2016 in London, England. Junior doctors will walk out from 8am to 10pm on Tuesday and Wednesday this week. They will stop providing emergency care for the first time in the ongoing dispute with the Government over the forced imposition of new contracts. Medical Leaders have called on the Prime Minister to intervene in the dispute to bring both sides back to the negotiating table.

The British Medical Association has agreed to re-enter talks with the Government over the junior doctors’ contract, it has been reported.

In a letter to the government, BMA junior doctors committee (JDC) chair wrote: “Today JDC decided to resume negotiations with Government on a new contract for junior doctors.

“This follows a proposal put forward by the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges calling on both sides in the dispute to restart negotiations on the outstanding issues.

“We have consistently sought talks since the decision to impose the contract was announced in February – a point we vigorously made in the week running up to last week’s industrial action.

“It’s testament to the resolve of junior doctors that the Government has now seen sense and agreed to talks.

“We remain firmly committed to a fair contract for all junior doctors – and for both current and future generations – so the profession can provide high quality care for our patients.”

So does the Independent.

The BMA has announced it will re-enter talks with the Government over the disputed junior doctors’ contract, which the Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt has said will be introduced.

This follows a series of strikes by junior doctors, after which the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges put forward a proposal calling on both sides to restart negotiations.

Commenting, Dr Johann Malawana, BMA junior doctor committee chair, said he hoped “real progress can now be made to ending this dispute through talks.”

“Junior doctors’ concerns extend far beyond pay, and our principle in talks will be to deliver a fair contract that does not discriminate against women or any other group, one which addresses the recruitment and retention crisis in the NHS and which provides the basis for delivering a world-class health service,” he said.

Sadiq Khan

The newly-elected London Mayor sends a warning to the Labour leader, reports the Express.

LONDON’S new mayor Sadiq Khan today warned Jeremy Corbyn that Labour must appeal to everyone and “not just its own activists” to have any chance of gaining power.

In a shot across the bows of his party leader, Mr Khan warned that relying on “natural” Labour voters would not be enough to triumph in 2020.

Under Mr Corbyn, Labour has been accused of returning to hardleft grass roots and ignoring the moderates – Mr Khan included – who are calling for a more wideranging appeal.

Mr Khan warned: “Campaigns that deliberately turn their back on particular groups are doomed to fail.”

Breitbart claims that the Daily Telegraph has ‘freaked out over Breitbart and Drudge ‘LondonisKahn’ headlines’.

Breitbart London’s headline when Sadiq Khan was elected Mayor of London yesterday gets prominence in today’s edition of Britain’s Telegraph newspaper.

In the belief that American conservatives are strange enough to be newsworthy in themselves, the paper dedicates a whole article to how U.S. websites reported Mr Khan’s election.

The first “influential right-wing website” the paper mentions is of course Breitbart, highlighting how the site led with the portmanteau “LondonisKhan”,  derivation of the ‘Londonistan’ moniker handed to the British capital by author Melanie Phillips.

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Debbie
About Debbie (624 Articles)
Debbie has been a journalist for longer than she cares to admit! She has been freelance for the last 15 years and is an associate editor on UKIP Daily, specialising in covering the morning press each day.

1 Comment on Sunday papers – 1 May 2016

  1. Anyone wishing to be/remain an EU Slave is quite welcome to move from my country to the EU. Please just Fk OFF! (including you Cameron, and you too what ever your name is, mate of cameron.. there is no way that you will be re elected).
    Meanwhile anyone wishing to enjoy the peace and quiet and comming prosperity of the UK (which many of my family died to secure) please Vote ‘Britian OUT’ on the 23rd. June. (as will I).

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