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Brexit: fast track negotiations

From current EU, to upgrading to self-governing democracy with option of EFTA/single market + opt outs

How about looking for an easy and fast track way to switch from EU/Single Market to a win-win agreement with EU countries, perhaps using the EFTA/Single Market + opt outs approach? This could help business confidence and also ease the strain on public services.

There could be three tracks for the negotiations:

  • Carrying out the negotiations
  • Using article 112 and 113 of the Single Market (EEA + European Economic Area) agreement to take ‘unilateral measures’ while negotiations are ongoing.
  • And simplifying the regulations in the UK

Firstly, having an idea of what the win-win agreement looks like is essential. This could include membership of EFTA (European Free Trade Association www.efta.int) and keeping free access to the Single Market with goods, services and capital – with all the rest under UK control, including movement of people.

– EFTA already exists, and EFTA member Liechtenstein has ‘special provisions’ for controlling immigration

– So, arranging a meeting with EU countries and say that the is UK looking for a win-win economic agreement, not a lose-win political/economic agreement, in order of preference EFTA/Single Market + Opt Outs (Norway, Liechtenstein), or EFTA/Bi-lateral (Switzerland), then FTA (South Korea), then WTO (China)

– Apply to EFTA countries for membership, using article 56, of EFTA Convention

– UK apply for membership of world organisations for speaking and voting, e.g. WTO

– Approach existing countries with Free Trade Agreements with EFTA-e.g. Canada – for implementing Free Trade Agreements

Secondly, using article 112 and 113 of the EEA agreement, for unilateral actions, for a win-win approach, i.e. that UK citizens could get in other countries, including standard of living, while carrying out negotiations with the EU.

This could be used in a number of areas, to get immediate benefits for the economy

  • All new Eastern European immigrants get only a one-year working visa, no children, no access to benefits and a points skills system for staying longer;
  • All other new EU immigrants have free movement, unless their unemployment is 7% or more, then they only get a one year working visa, no children, no access to benefits and a points system for staying longer. Things that may help reduce their unemployment rate could include restoring their original currencies;
  • If the UK unemployment rate is 7% or more, then all new EU immigrants only get a one-year working visa, no children, no access to benefits, points skills system for staying longer;
  • Any new immigrant with an EU passport from any EU country, who was not born in an EU country to EU parents, does not get any free movement or automatic working visa and needs to apply, using a point system, no children, no access to benefits. i.e. people who have bought their passports in other EU countries do not get automatic entry to work and live in the UK;
  • Optional: anyone who has already arrived in the last five years from Eastern Europe is not entitled to benefits, including access to council housing. Anyone who has arrived in the last five years from other EU countries with unemployment rate 7% or over does is not entitled to benefits;
  • Any EU citizen with a previous serious crime criminal record – crime against property, financial crime, crimes against the person across any age group – is deported. Any EU citizen convicted in the UK for a crime – property, financial or person – is deported and serves sentence in EU country of origin;
  • Anyone from an EU country wishing to buy a residential property can only buy after living five years in the UK and paying tax – similar to Denmark.

Thirdly, simplifying regulations.

Setting up an online system for easily accessing, searching, sorting and finding regulations, their source and use, for all areas in the UK, including national, county and local government, so working groups can review all existing regulations and simplify. For example:

UK law

  • UK law number, relevant Ministry, topic
  • text of law, any paperwork used for implementation
  • who affected, numbers of people and businesses, cost/benefits, usage

EEA/Single Market law

  • EEA law number
  • UK law number, relevant Ministry, topic
  • text of law and listing of any UK additions, any paperwork used for implementation
  • who affected, numbers of people and businesses, cost/benefits, usage

EU law

  • EU law number
  • UK law number, relevant Ministry, topic
  • text of law and listing of any UK additions, any paperwork used for implementation
  • who affected, numbers of people and businesses, cost/benefits, usage

World laws

  • World body law number
  • UK law number, relevant Ministry, topic
  • text of law and listing of any UK additions, any paperwork used for implementation
  • who affected, numbers of people and businesses, cost/benefits, usage

Process: Select committee, consulting all relevant parties, for ideas and any ‘quick wins’

  • Ask for advice from experts in existing EFTA countries, for simplifying
  • Ask for advice from experts in other successful countries

Listing of all articles and regulations from current treaty that are to be run by Parliament, including:

  • Movement of people
  • Environment
  • Social chapter
  • European Convention of Human Rights

For setting up cross party groups, to look at:

  • What works for the UK
  • what has had unintended side affects
  • incorporating ‘net benefit’ articles and regulations, in whole or part into UK law
  • repealing ‘net cost’ articles and regulations

In addition, for fast track simplifying:

  • Ask industry groups – small, medium and large – for listing of regulations and laws that hinder job creation and productivity, including ‘gold-plating’ that add costs that prevent small businesses competing with larger businesses
  • Include a listing of which regulations make it difficult for small businesses to tender for public sector contracts and also compete with larger companies in the wider economy, e.g. excessive paperwork
  • Ask union groups for listing, as above, and also areas where health and safety is an issue
  • Listing also from charities and public sector of regulations unnecessary, since they do not export to the EU, i.e. since only 9% of the economy is involved with EU trade, eliminating unnecessary regulations for the other 91% of the economy
  • Listing of adverse rulings from the European Convention of Human Rights, that reward criminals, overrule other laws passed by Parliament, lead to loss of public faith in the legal system, are no benefit and merely create jobs in the legal profession. Listing also good rulings from the ECHR. Then look to simplify the ECHR, to be aligned with values of UK legal system and evolution.
  • Use the 80/20 rule for prioritising, i.e. which 20% of suggestions, would give 80% of the benefits listed

Use article 112 and 113 for implementing the above and evaluate ongoing. It is also possible to start with trials in certain parts of the country, if this makes sense, before going for a nationwide implementation of unnecessary regulations

This is an easier way to accelerate the benefits for implementing prosperity, keeping it transparent, for the public to have faith and not have big cartels, special interest groups and vote-buying politicians decide the outcomes. So restoring government of the people, by the people, for the people, prosperity for the many and also making it easier for other countries in the EU to see benefits of voting leaving the EU and upgrading to democracy.

https://www.facebook.com/EFTA4UK/

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About Hugo van Randwyck (41 Articles)
Hugo van Randwyck has been researching fast track options for self-government, via EFTA options, including opinion polls. He has business experience in change management and management training.

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